Taylor Freeman

Platform Shifts: From the Internet, to Mobile, to Immersive

September 11, 2019 3:00pm
MIT Campus

Audience:

MIT Faculty, MIT Students, MIT Community, Public

Category:

xTalk

Join us for a thought provoking conversation about the coming wave of immersive learning. Like the internet, personal computing and mobile, immersive devices like virtual and augmented reality are poised to yet again transform the way our world learns. Imagine being able to teleport to the colosseum in Rome to learn history, to the scale of an atom to learn chemistry, or simply to a virtual theater to watch a presentation from the best professors at MIT... all from anywhere in the world. With virtual reality, this becomes possible.

In this xTalk we will cover a brief history of the technology platform shifts that have driven the evolution of distance learning, review the current state of immersive technology, explore some ideas around where things might head in the future and ponder some of the philosophical and practical questions we will need to ask on the journey to get there.

Taylor Freeman is the Founder & CEO of Axon Park, a virtual campus where students from around the world can learn together in VR. He has been working at the intersection of VR and education over the last five years during which time he established two incubation spaces in LA and San Francisco housing over 150 AR and AI startups, hosted over 500 events focused around VR and AR, oversaw the training of nearly 1,000 students in-person on VR development, consulted with companies like NASA, Stanford Medical, Google, and IDEO and built a news media platform focused on VR that reaches millions of people per month. Taylor was awarded Forbes 30 Under 30 in 2017 for his work building the industry and he taught the first remote in-VR class with the MIT media lab in October 2018. He is deeply passionate about using VR to unlock new levels of human cognition and overcome the challenges many students face in the classroom around geographical limitations, student and teacher bias, and overall accessibility.